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3 Critical Factors of Dietary Supplement Formulations

3 Critical Factors of Dietary Supplement Formulations

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3 Critical Factors of Dietary Supplement Formulations

3 Critical Factors of Dietary Supplement Formulations

Guest Blog Post from Designs for Health

The 2002 World Health Report anticipated that by the year 2020 chronic non-communicable disease would attribute to 73% of all deaths and 60% of the global disease burden. In the report, The World Health Organization (WHO) stated the need for the “development of an integrated approach that will target all major common risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus (DM), cancer and chronic respiratory diseases in the most cost-effective way to prevent and control them.” These assertions and statistics showcase the acute need for preventative medicine, which often includes the application of dietary supplements and nutraceuticals, and the adoption of lifestyle changes and dietary habits.

Dietary supplements are nutritional substances formulated and intended to augment the diet by increasing the total dietary intake. The ingredients in dietary supplements include vitamins, minerals, herbs or botanicals, and amino acids.

According to the 2019 Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN) Consumer Survey on Dietary Supplements, 77% of U.S. adults report taking dietary supplements; however, a 2019 survey from AARP revealed 46% of consumers are concerned with the effectiveness of supplements. Moreover, 44% of supplement users question the purity and safety of ingredients, and 40% are concerned about testing transparency, according to the same survey.

 

Targeted supplementation implemented by Nutritional Therapy Practitioners can help to fill nutritional gaps, address nutrient deficiencies, and support the body’s vital metabolic processes where needed. Therefore, it’s critical to choose and recommend the highest quality dietary supplements available on the market to support desired health outcomes. Unfortunately, it can be challenging to identify key differentiators in innovation, formulation, ingredient selection, and manufacturing that influence product efficacy and quality. Here, we will discuss the importance of supplementation and three primary factors to consider when selecting ideal dietary supplements to ensure the highest quality for patient and client care.

Quality and Purity

Dietary supplements must meet FDA testing requirements. It is important to seek formulas and brands that go through several levels of quality control and testing before being sold to the public. Fortunately, there are practitioner-brand dietary supplement manufacturers that follow regulatory oversight adhering to current Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) that source only the highest quality raw materials for formulating their products. It’s essential to choose companies that are third-party audited and certified by the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) to ensure public safety and to verify the formulas meet the highest levels of quality and purity, identity and strength, in addition to ensuring that their composition match the product label claims.

Label transparency is also a critical component in choosing the best dietary supplements for your clients/patients. For the best clinical outcomes, it’s imperative to recommend supplements that are formulated without common allergens (e.g., dairy, soy, gluten) or other potentially harmful excipients (i.e., other ingredients). Avoid products that use potentially harmful preservatives, genetically modified ingredients, artificial colors, and/or sweeteners, sugars, and other fillers that may be detrimental to desired health outcomes. Practitioners and clients must learn how to read and understand ingredient labels and supplement facts to prevent exposure to these often “hidden” ingredients.

Bioavailability

The term “bioavailability” refers to the amount or proportion of a substance, nutrient, or botanical that can be absorbed, enter the body’s circulation, and impart its physiological and biological effects. Supplements formulated to have high bioavailability will be more effective at achieving the desired health outcome, as they have better metabolic activity, remain in the serum longer, and do not break down as quickly. Manufacturing processes formulated to utilize specific nutrients, ingredients, technologies, and/or delivery methods that enhance the bioactive compound’s ability to enter circulation is an important factor when considering dietary supplementation.

 

Additionally, it’s equally important to choose products that leverage the latest scientific research and evidence and are formulated by using the optimal nutrient forms to ensure superior efficacy. Some nutrients are available in a more biologically identical and accessible form. For example, research shows that folate — specifically in the methylated or calcium folinate composition — is the more optimal, bioavailable form that promotes beneficial health outcomes over synthetic folic acid. Likewise, using amino acid-chelated mineral forms, such as magnesium bisglycinate or ferrous bisglycinate, improves bioavailability and can help decrease common unpleasant gastrointestinal effects, such as diarrhea or constipation, versus using elemental forms, such as magnesium oxide, ferrous sulfate.

Clinically Relevant Dosing

The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) is the average daily dietary intake level that is sufficient to meet the nutrient requirement of nearly all (97% to 98%) healthy individuals in a particular life stage and gender group” based on scientific data, but when scientific evidence is not available, the Adequate Intake (AI) is used instead of the RDA, which is “based on experimentally derived intake levels or approximations of observed mean nutrient intakes by a group of healthy people. These values were calculated to avoid frank or overt nutrient deficiencies, but not necessarily to provide optimal health and wellness. The prevalence of environmental and lifestyle factors in Western societies further complicates and compounds nutrient demands, including nutrient-poor diets, improper digestion and absorption, medication-associated nutrient depletions, pre-existing conditions, inflammation, food sensitivities or allergies, and oxidative stress levels. These additional deterrents to achieving adequate nutrient status support supplementation above the current RDA and AI values established by the Institute of Medicine and the National Academies of Sciences.

 

Initial conditions of insufficiency are seen at a biochemical level often without any overt symptoms. As the duration of the insufficiency increases, additional changes appear in cellular function that can be seen as subclinical manifestations, and as the insufficiency progresses, morphological and functional changes occur that can be defined as early-stage disease. Nutrition may be the single most influential component of health maintenance since diet is the determining factor in many chronic diseases. Furthermore, certain nutrients are not efficacious unless they reach a certain amount in the serum. For these reasons, it is important to supplement above the RDAs and AIs to help replete the body with the micronutrients it needs to improve metabolic function and overall health.

As you approach client care and implement dietary supplements into your nutritional therapy protocols, consider these important factors regarding formulation (i.e., quality and purity, bioavailability, and clinically relevant dosing) to help determine the best options for your patients’ target health outcomes.

By Caitlin Higgins, MS, CNS, LDN
Technical Writer and Educational Content Developer for Designs for Health

The views and opinions expressed in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the NTA. They are intended for general information purposes, and are not to be considered a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 

 

 

 


 

 

Join us for a Live Webinar with one of our Instructors and Admissions Advisors!

During this call, you’ll explore and learn:

  • How to create a rewarding career in holistic nutrition that will give you the confidence and competence to replace your full-time income (whether you’re new to nutrition or or using it to enhance your current services)
  • How our unmatched education and instructor support sets our NTP program apart from other nutrition programs​​​​​​​
  • How graduates are successfully using their education and the many career opportunities available to you
  • If the NTP program is the right fit for you and how to move forward in financing your education

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You Are What You Digest: 5 Strategies for supporting your digestive system

You Are What You Digest: 5 Strategies for supporting your digestive system

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You Are What You Digest: 5 Strategies for supporting your digestive system

You are what you digest: 5 strategies for supporting your digestive system

They say you are what you eat, but the reality is that you’re really made up of what you digest. These may sound the same, but unfortunately, they are not always. If our digestive systems are not functioning properly, our bodies are unable to fully break down and absorb the nutrients we consume.

If we are prioritizing a nutrient-dense, whole foods diet, we want to make sure our cells are able to use all the wonderful nutrients we are providing. We’re going to give you five strategies to help you support proper digestion, but first, let’s discuss how digestion works.

How digestion works

Before we jump into solutions for supporting digestion, we think it’s important to have a baseline understanding of how it works. This understanding will connect you to why we recommend what we do, so we’re not giving you a random to-do list of behavior modifications. Let’s get to it.

Brain 

Digestion is a north to south process that begins in the brain. The sight and smell of food triggers the salivary glands to begin producing saliva.

Mouth

The mouth is the physical gateway to the digestive system where mechanical and chemical breakdown of the food begins. One solute in saliva is the enzyme salivary amylase, which begins carbohydrate digestion.

Stomach

Food enters the stomach as bolus. The stomach continues the mechanical breakdown of the bolus, along with a number of chemical activities and turns it into chyme.

Small Intestine

Chyme enters the duodenum and travels through the small intestines and stimulates the production of other enzymes. This is where the bulk of nutrient absorption happens.

Large Intestine

The large intestine recycles water and waste material, which nourishes the colon cells. It captures any lost nutrients that are still available (with the help of the bowel flora) and converts the nutrients to Vitamins K/B1/B2/B12 and butyric acid. Then the remnants form and are eliminated as feces.

5 Strategies for supporting your digestive system

The strategies below are powerful tools that can help you support your digestion. Implement them into your life to keep things moving properly and fuel your cells with all the goodness that nutrient-dense, whole foods have to offer.

1. Reduce stress

Digestion works best when we are in a relaxed (or parasympathetic) state. Avoid fight-or-flight hormones like epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline), which interrupt proper digestion. You can do this several ways, including taking a few deep breaths before eating. For more ideascheck out this blog post on reducing stress. 

2. Slow down and chew your food

This one is vital. Eat meals slowly and chew food thoroughly in order to break down carbohydrates and activate other enzymes before moving onto the next stage in digestion. Try not eat in the car or in front of the television as these activities tend to make us eat more quickly. Sit down and make your meal the main event!

3. Hydrate

It is important to stay adequately hydrated throughout the day so that your body can properly transport nutrients through your digestive tract. If you have trouble doing this, try finding a water bottle you love (we’re talking pretty colors, fancy straws, the whole nine yards!). It may sound silly, but if you love your water bottle, you might be more likely to carry it around with you and drink throughout the day.

4. Eat fermented foods

Besides being a delicious and fun way to variety to your diet, fermented foods also support your gut. They increase bioavailable nutrients and are easier to digest. The microorganisms they contain support overall gut health. (We wrote this blog post to help you increase the fermented foods in your diet.)

5. Take a walk

Movement is useful not only for reducing stress but also for stimulating the muscle contractions necessary for digestion. If you suffer from slow digestion, a 15-minute walk after each meal is a great way to improve digestion.

Digestion is one of the NTA’s foundations of health. If you’re interested in learning more about digestion and the other foundations, check out the Nutritional Therapy Practitioner Online program. 


 

 

Join us for a Live Webinar with one of our Instructors and Admissions Advisors!

During this call, you’ll explore and learn:

  • How to create a rewarding career in holistic nutrition that will give you the confidence and competence to replace your full-time income (whether you’re new to nutrition or or using it to enhance your current services)
  • How our unmatched education and instructor support sets our NTP program apart from other nutrition programs​​​​​​​
  • How graduates are successfully using their education and the many career opportunities available to you
  • If the NTP program is the right fit for you and how to move forward in financing your education

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How to Become a Holistic Nutrition Professional In 10 Months!

How to Become a Holistic Nutrition Professional In 10 Months!

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How to Become a Holistic Nutrition Professional In 10 Months!

How to become a holistic nutrition professional in 10 months

If the title of this blog posts seems familiar that’s because it’s also the name of our most popular webinar. Why do we keep harping on this message? Because we think it’s kind of a big deal. With our program, you can pivot your health and career and become a holistic nutrition professional in just TEN MONTHS.

The breadth of knowledge offered by the Nutritional Therapy Practitioner Online program in this amount of time speaks not only to the quality of our top-notch curriculum, but also the skill and passion of our instructors.

You have the opportunity to hear from these instructors, and the admissions team members who know this program inside and out, before you even sign up. Our webinar is a valuable resource to you, whether you just found us, have been considering this for years, or already have a notepad full of questions and concerns.

The three things you’ll hear about during a webinar are: turning your passion into practice, gaining the knowledge and confidence to earn income, and making an impact.

Take your passion and put it into practice 

Many students come to us already brimming with a deep love and respect for nutrition. We think this is something that makes our community special. Wonderful things happen when passionate people are finally able to practice what they love.

Here’s how Kristin, a current NTP student, felt about jumping in to pursue her passion:

“2021 is about getting out of my own way … so here I come NTA. I’m so excited, nervous, all the things, to be working towards the title of Nutritional Therapy Practitioner. I’ve been eyeing this program for quite a while and it’s time to stop wasting time and jump in. 

Holistic wellness is what lights me up. The NTA’s approach aligns with my own beliefs so it’s a perfect match. Their program is based on a foundational holistic approach to nutrition honoring the individual and their uniqueness because no one size fits all! 

So much knowledge is about to be dropped and I cannot wait to better be able to serve clients and this space.”


Gain the knowledge and confidence to replace or supplement your full-time income

There is so much you can do with the letters NT, and P behind your name. Read about how these graduates have turned this work into their livelihoods.

“ONE month ago today I left my corporate job to do Balance Made Simple… FULL TIME! 
 
I DREAMED of this day, and I can’t believe I have spent the last 30 days living it. It was PAST time, and I wanted to be able to offer MORE for YOU. 
 
Now – I have all the time I’ve dreamed of to create recipes for you, create new.. well you’ll see … take MORE 1:1 clients, AND perfect my FAVORITE program, Back to the Basics. SO much goodness coming soon – I CANNOT WAIT to help each and everyone one of you with your health goals. If I’ve learned anything over the last 6 months, its the POWER and NEED for nutritional therapy. 
 
DREAMS come true, and if your dream is to say good-bye to pesky health issues you’ve been struggling with your whole life – don’t wait any longer! There is a way without them, and my gosh is it worth it!” – Andrea from Balance Made Simple 


“Today marks my second week of being MY OWN BOSS {and I’m already full-time with my businesses!} 

Here are some reflections from the first 7 days: 

• I am absolutely PUMPED to spring out of bed every morning to work on my nutritional therapy and mentoring businesses (even on my days off 😁) 
• I get to choose WHO I work with and have been attracting the most amazing female clients and mentees ☺️ 
• I no longer carry the weight of feeling like I have to prove myself to anyone or show that I am capable or qualified (when I was over-qualified all along) 
• When you find the thing that lights you up, you WILL succeed at it 
• Stepping outside your comfort zone and taking chances every single day will absolutely pay off 
• Yes, the health and wellness market is completely oversaturated BUT the world needs more NTP’s and the success of my new business proves that! 
• It truly is NEVER TOO LATE to start something. I’ve known for over 15 years that one day I’d be my own boss. All roads led me here.” – Autumn of Crusading Wellness 


Turn your desire to help others into a rewarding career, while making an impact 

If your desire is to help others, you’re in good company. One thing all NTPs have in common is that they are making an impact —in their own lives, their families, their communities, and the world.

Maria, a current NTP student, is driven by her desire to help people and decided to maximize her impact by becoming an NTP.

“Guess what! I did a thing! Invested more in myself and going back to school to become a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner! 
 
I always have been drawn to work with people, give them knowledge and tools to make effective change in their life- no surprise I have a Masters in Social Work, and now I’ll be able to learn about nutrition, combining traditional wisdom and scientific research through the NTA program. 
 
I’m excited for this journey to begin and to be able to apply what I learn with my future clients.”


As an NTP student, you will be equipped to go out and make a serious impact. If you’d like to learn more and chat with our instructors and admissions team members, join us for our next webinar. You too can become a holistic nutritional professional in just 10 months!

Want your recipe or article to be featured on our blog? Email our team Marketing@nutritionaltherapy.com with your full name, article, a short bio in third person, and a headshot. We may feature you in an upcoming blog post.

 

 

 


 

 

Join us for a Live Webinar with one of our Instructors and Admissions Advisors!

During this call, you’ll explore and learn:

  • How to create a rewarding career in holistic nutrition that will give you the confidence and competence to replace your full-time income (whether you’re new to nutrition or or using it to enhance your current services)
  • How our unmatched education and instructor support sets our NTP program apart from other nutrition programs​​​​​​​
  • How graduates are successfully using their education and the many career opportunities available to you
  • If the NTP program is the right fit for you and how to move forward in financing your education

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Eat Real Food: The Power of a Nutrient-Dense, Whole Foods Diet

Eat Real Food: The Power of a Nutrient-Dense, Whole Foods Diet

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Eat Real Food: The Power of a Nutrient-Dense, Whole Foods Diet

Eat Real Food: The Power of a nutrient-dense, whole foods diet

Overly processed, chemically enhanced foods have become a convenient preference in our modern diet. Years of relying on these nutrient-poor, calorie-rich options have changed our mindset toward both food and health. Unhealthy habits and unbalanced meals have led to health concerns like digestion issues, hormonal imbalances, blood sugar swings, and trouble sleeping.

Unfortunately, people tend to see these problems as “normal”, but simple changes to the food we eat can make a huge difference.

We suggest starting with the basics: a nutrient-dense, properly prepared, whole foods diet.

In the Nutritional Therapy Online program we believe that “real food” has the power to make a positive impact on health, and that everything, from healthy digestion to hydration and everything in betweenstems from fueling our bodies with the right nutrients.

The energy we need to get up and go each day, the focus we need to check items off our todo lists, and the fuel we need to keep our bodies functioning are all impacted by the foodwe eat.

When we choose to support our bodies with the right foods, we thrive. When we pick unhealthy alternatives and deprive our bodies of what they need….wellwe all know how that feels.

What is a nutrient-dense, whole foods diet?

We are all different, and depending on the season, our gender, age, ancestry, activity level, and stress load, we might need different sources of fuel to feel, look, and perform our best. But, knowing which foods are the best options and how to properly source them is a great place to startFor a balanced, nutrient-dense diet, aim to eat foods that are:

What is a nutrient-dense, whole foods diet?

Simple ways to eat more whole foods

Small changes and habits can go a long way when it comes to learning how to fuel our bodies properlyTaking the time to learn and try new things is a great way to connect with the food we eat and understand the amazing ways in which our bodies work. There is no one-size fitsall approach to nutrition, but there are ways that you can easily start incorporating whole foods into your diet. Here are a few guidelines to follow: 

  • As much as possible, try to eat foods in their natural, unprocessed form
  • Try to have 5 different colors of food on your plate for a range of vitamins and minerals
  • Look for labels with few ingredients that come from whole foods
  • Replace processed foods with healthier, whole food alternatives
  • Source food from local farmers and ranchers in your area
  • Plan a trip to the farmers market or purchase a local CSA box for produce 
  • Try to eat plenty of carbohydrates, protein, and healthy fats throughout the day

Let Food Be Thy Medicine and Medicine be thy food

Health concerns like digestive issues, trouble sleeping, and blood sugar swings are common but they are not normal. We deserve to feel good and that starts with taking the time to make better choices when it comes to the foods we eat. Eating nutrient-dense, whole foods diet is the first step in giving our bodies the fuel it needs to thrive.

Want your recipe or article to be featured on our blog? Email our team Marketing@nutritionaltherapy.com with your full name, article, a short bio in third person, and a headshot. We may feature you in an upcoming blog post.

 

 

 


 

 

Join us for a Live Webinar with one of our Instructors and Admissions Advisors!

During this call, you’ll explore and learn:

  • How to create a rewarding career in holistic nutrition that will give you the confidence and competence to replace your full-time income (whether you’re new to nutrition or or using it to enhance your current services)
  • How our unmatched education and instructor support sets our NTP program apart from other nutrition programs​​​​​​​
  • How graduates are successfully using their education and the many career opportunities available to you
  • If the NTP program is the right fit for you and how to move forward in financing your education

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5 Nutrition Tips For Working From Home

5 Nutrition Tips For Working From Home

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5 Nutrition Tips For Working From Home

5 Nutrition Tips for Working from Home

 

Whether you are brand new to working from home or a remote work pro this is for you.

Eating nourishing, nutrient-dense foods throughout the day is super importantNot only do they make you feel great, but also give you more energy and help you be more productive. 

Here are five tips to help you prioritize nutrition while working from home. 

Find a rhythm that works for you

Try to eat meals around the same time every day. This way, you won’t accidentally skip meals when you’re in the zone and haven’t looked at the time in 4 hours.  

When you’re in the habit of eating at a certain time, that time serves as an opportunity to check in with your hunger level and eat a meal if you’re hungry.

Snacking all day when you’re not hungry keeps you from being in tune with your true hunger. It also often prevents you from ever seeking out a full meal. Full meals tend to include more nutrient-dense foods like vegetables and fat and protein sources that are harder (though not impossible) to find in snack form.

There is no rule you need to follow as to how frequently you should be eating. Some people find that 3 large meals a day with periods of fasting in between is best for them. Others find that eating every 2-3 hours helps them stabilize their blood sugar and support their hormones. 

Whatever timing you prefer, a rhythm will help you be intentional with your meals and ensure you’re getting the vitamins and minerals you need from your diet. 

Keep a water bottle with at all times

Water is vital for healthy functions like digestion, detoxification, and the immune system. Dehydration can cause or contribute to fatigue, anxiety, irritability, cramps, headache, heartburn, constipation, and back pain.

If you keep a water bottle at your work area, you’ll be more likely to sip water throughout the day. Try to drink most of your water in between meal times, not with your meals.

Why? Sipping throughout the day is better for your digestion than drinking water with your meals because excess liquid can water down digestive juices that are needed to break down food and alter the pH of the stomach environment.

A good rule of thumb to figure out if you’re drinking enough water is to divide your body weight by two. That number in ounces is your starting point.

Extra credit: find or invest in a water bottle you LOVE. This may seem silly, but if you love your water bottle, you’ll drink more water! 

Eat plenty of healthy fats

All three macronutrients (fat, protein, and carbs) are important sources of energy, but fat tends to be the one people are most afraid of because of the misconceptions that dietary fat is the same as body fat or causes heart disease. 

In reality, fatty acids are a very important part of a nutrient-dense diet.  

Fatty acids are a great concentrated source of energy. They help regulate energy absorption by slowing the absorption of food, so they also keep you satiated for longer.

This is why having fat in your diet is so valuable—it gives you a slow-burning energy to get through your workday. 

Here are ideas of great fat sources to incorporate into your diet: 

  • Walnuts 
  • Pumpkin seed 
  • Cod Liver Oil 
  • Coconut Oil 
  • Eggs 
  • Butter 
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil 
  • Avocados and Avocado Oil  
  • Duck/Chicken/Goose/Turkey Fat  
  • Salmon and other fish 
  • Fatty animal meat from pastured animals

Plan meals ahead of time

If you plan out your meals for the week during the weekend, you’ll be more likely to choose nutrient-dense options.

There are a few ways to do this, with varying degrees of work up front.

For starters, you can make nutrient-dense food available. Purchase foods like meat, vegetables, fruits, grains, and nuts and seeds. Keep your fridge, freezer, and pantry stocked with options you can make.

If you want to do all the leg work up front so that you can have grab-and-go meals ready throughout the week, take a few hours on a Saturday or Sunday to make big batches of several meals and separate them out into smaller containers.

We find that chilis, soups, casseroles, and sheet pan meals work particularly well. We love these meal-prep-friendly sheet pan recipes created by one of our graduates, Alison Marras.

It’s a lot of work up front but the pay-off is that instead of mustering up the willpower to cook on a Wednesday afternoon, you can sit back, relax, and enjoy your pre-prepared meal.

Have fun with it

A nutrient-dense diet doesn’t have to mean quinoa, broccoli, and chicken for every meal. A nutrient-dense diet can be fun and flavorful and even a form of self-expression!

It can be easy to fall into the rut of eating the same things week-in and week-out. Not only does this prevent us from getting the diverse variety of nutrients we need, but it can also make us sick and tired of the same ole’ veggies we always make. 

Food is for fuel, but it is also for pleasure. Cook things you enjoy! Try new recipes to give your usual rotation a break. Here are some ideas to get you started:

Taking Care from Home 

It’s far too easy to neglect your health when working from home. There always seems to be something else to do. But prioritizing nutrition is worth it, and following these tips are a great way to start.

  • Find a rhythm that works for you 
  • Keep a water bottle with you 
  • Eat adequate fat 
  • Plan meals ahead of time 
  • Have fun with it 

You take care of many things throughout the day—make yourself one of them.

 


 

Want your recipe or article to be featured on our blog? Email our team Marketing@nutritionaltherapy.com with your full name, article, a short bio in third person, and a headshot. We may feature you in an upcoming blog post.

Resources:

  1. Nutritional Therapy Association (2019). Hydration Module Study Guide. Olympia, WA.   
  2. Hazzard, V. M., Telke, S. E., Simone, M., Anderson, L. M., Larson, N. I., & Neumark-Sztainer, D. (2020, January 31). Intuitive eating longitudinally predicts better psychological health and lower use of disordered eating behaviors: findings from EAT 2010-2018. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32006391 
  3. Nutritional Therapy Association (2019). Fatty Acids Study Guide. Olympia, WA. 

 

Join us for a Live Webinar with one of our Instructors and Admissions Advisors!

During this call, you’ll explore and learn:

  • How to create a rewarding career in holistic nutrition that will give you the confidence and competence to replace your full-time income (whether you’re new to nutrition or or using it to enhance your current services)
  • How our unmatched education and instructor support sets our NTP program apart from other nutrition programs​​​​​​​
  • How graduates are successfully using their education and the many career opportunities available to you
  • If the NTP program is the right fit for you and how to move forward in financing your education

Categories

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