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5 Nutrition Tips For Working From Home

5 Nutrition Tips For Working From Home

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5 Nutrition Tips For Working From Home

5 Nutrition Tips for Working from Home

 

Whether you are brand new to working from home or a remote work pro this is for you.

Eating nourishing, nutrient-dense foods throughout the day is super importantNot only do they make you feel great, but also give you more energy and help you be more productive. 

Here are five tips to help you prioritize nutrition while working from home. 

Find a rhythm that works for you

Try to eat meals around the same time every day. This way, you won’t accidentally skip meals when you’re in the zone and haven’t looked at the time in 4 hours.  

When you’re in the habit of eating at a certain time, that time serves as an opportunity to check in with your hunger level and eat a meal if you’re hungry.

Snacking all day when you’re not hungry keeps you from being in tune with your true hunger. It also often prevents you from ever seeking out a full meal. Full meals tend to include more nutrient-dense foods like vegetables and fat and protein sources that are harder (though not impossible) to find in snack form.

There is no rule you need to follow as to how frequently you should be eating. Some people find that 3 large meals a day with periods of fasting in between is best for them. Others find that eating every 2-3 hours helps them stabilize their blood sugar and support their hormones. 

Whatever timing you prefer, a rhythm will help you be intentional with your meals and ensure you’re getting the vitamins and minerals you need from your diet. 

Keep a water bottle with at all times

Water is vital for healthy functions like digestion, detoxification, and the immune system. Dehydration can cause or contribute to fatigue, anxiety, irritability, cramps, headache, heartburn, constipation, and back pain.

If you keep a water bottle at your work area, you’ll be more likely to sip water throughout the day. Try to drink most of your water in between meal times, not with your meals.

Why? Sipping throughout the day is better for your digestion than drinking water with your meals because excess liquid can water down digestive juices that are needed to break down food and alter the pH of the stomach environment.

A good rule of thumb to figure out if you’re drinking enough water is to divide your body weight by two. That number in ounces is your starting point.

Extra credit: find or invest in a water bottle you LOVE. This may seem silly, but if you love your water bottle, you’ll drink more water! 

Eat plenty of healthy fats

All three macronutrients (fat, protein, and carbs) are important sources of energy, but fat tends to be the one people are most afraid of because of the misconceptions that dietary fat is the same as body fat or causes heart disease. 

In reality, fatty acids are a very important part of a nutrient-dense diet.  

Fatty acids are a great concentrated source of energy. They help regulate energy absorption by slowing the absorption of food, so they also keep you satiated for longer.

This is why having fat in your diet is so valuable—it gives you a slow-burning energy to get through your workday. 

Here are ideas of great fat sources to incorporate into your diet: 

  • Walnuts 
  • Pumpkin seed 
  • Cod Liver Oil 
  • Coconut Oil 
  • Eggs 
  • Butter 
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil 
  • Avocados and Avocado Oil  
  • Duck/Chicken/Goose/Turkey Fat  
  • Salmon and other fish 
  • Fatty animal meat from pastured animals

Plan meals ahead of time

If you plan out your meals for the week during the weekend, you’ll be more likely to choose nutrient-dense options.

There are a few ways to do this, with varying degrees of work up front.

For starters, you can make nutrient-dense food available. Purchase foods like meat, vegetables, fruits, grains, and nuts and seeds. Keep your fridge, freezer, and pantry stocked with options you can make.

If you want to do all the leg work up front so that you can have grab-and-go meals ready throughout the week, take a few hours on a Saturday or Sunday to make big batches of several meals and separate them out into smaller containers.

We find that chilis, soups, casseroles, and sheet pan meals work particularly well. We love these meal-prep-friendly sheet pan recipes created by one of our graduates, Alison Marras.

It’s a lot of work up front but the pay-off is that instead of mustering up the willpower to cook on a Wednesday afternoon, you can sit back, relax, and enjoy your pre-prepared meal.

Have fun with it

A nutrient-dense diet doesn’t have to mean quinoa, broccoli, and chicken for every meal. A nutrient-dense diet can be fun and flavorful and even a form of self-expression!

It can be easy to fall into the rut of eating the same things week-in and week-out. Not only does this prevent us from getting the diverse variety of nutrients we need, but it can also make us sick and tired of the same ole’ veggies we always make. 

Food is for fuel, but it is also for pleasure. Cook things you enjoy! Try new recipes to give your usual rotation a break. Here are some ideas to get you started:

Taking Care from Home 

It’s far too easy to neglect your health when working from home. There always seems to be something else to do. But prioritizing nutrition is worth it, and following these tips are a great way to start.

  • Find a rhythm that works for you 
  • Keep a water bottle with you 
  • Eat adequate fat 
  • Plan meals ahead of time 
  • Have fun with it 

You take care of many things throughout the day—make yourself one of them.

 


 

Want your recipe or article to be featured on our blog? Email our team Marketing@nutritionaltherapy.com with your full name, article, a short bio in third person, and a headshot. We may feature you in an upcoming blog post.

Resources:

  1. Nutritional Therapy Association (2019). Hydration Module Study Guide. Olympia, WA.   
  2. Hazzard, V. M., Telke, S. E., Simone, M., Anderson, L. M., Larson, N. I., & Neumark-Sztainer, D. (2020, January 31). Intuitive eating longitudinally predicts better psychological health and lower use of disordered eating behaviors: findings from EAT 2010-2018. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32006391 
  3. Nutritional Therapy Association (2019). Fatty Acids Study Guide. Olympia, WA. 

 

Join us for a Live Webinar with one of our Instructors and Admissions Advisors!

During this call, you’ll explore and learn:

  • How to create a rewarding career in holistic nutrition that will give you the confidence and competence to replace your full-time income (whether you’re new to nutrition or or using it to enhance your current services)
  • How our unmatched education and instructor support sets our NTP program apart from other nutrition programs​​​​​​​
  • How graduates are successfully using their education and the many career opportunities available to you
  • If the NTP program is the right fit for you and how to move forward in financing your education

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Macronutrients: What Are They and Why Do We Need Them?

Macronutrients: What Are They and Why Do We Need Them?

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Home » Posts Tagged "Healthy fats"

Macronutrients: What Are They and Why Do We Need Them?

macronutrients

 

When talking about healthy diets and food choices, the word macros is always thrown around. Eating a meal with all three macros present is super important for health and daily function, but what exactly are macros? 

Macros, short for macronutrients, are three categories of nutrients that are essential for the body to function properly. They are: carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. 

 

Carbohydrates: 

  • Great source of fuel for the brain 
  • Provides energy to muscles while regulating blood sugar  
  • Stores energy within cells for later use 
  • Great source of fiber  
  • Helps fight infection

carbohydrates


Fats:
 

  • Great source of energy for the body and for the muscle around the heart 
  • Helps build cell membranes and produce hormones 
  • Required to absorb vitamins A, D, E, and K 
  • Provides a protective lining around organs 

healthy fats


Proteins:

  • The building blocks of enzymes, tissues, organs, nerves, and muscles  
  • Have an antibody structure that fights infection 
  • Transports oxygen around the body in the form of red blood cells 
  • Helps regulate metabolism 

proteins

Each individual’s ideal protein, carbohydrateand fat intake will vary based on age, activity level, digestive health, health goals, etc., yet a good starting point for most people is to have their daily calorie intake coming from 40% carbohydrates, 30% fats, and 30% protein.  

Be sure to get a variety of macronutrient in at every meal so you can stay full, energized, and show the day who’s boss.

 


 

Candice Berman

This article was written by NTA graduate,
Candice Berman, FNTP.

Candice is a certified Functional Nutritional Therapy Practitioner who understands what it feels like to be sick, frustrated, and losing hope. Her personal health journey of battling Lyme disease, gut dysfunction, hormone imbalance, and autoimmunity has ignited her passion for supporting people who are looking to thrive again. She believes that dysfunction doesn’t define people, but are just part of their story. She is grateful that because of her own holistic healing, she is now able to empower others to rediscover their health and their joy.  

You can find Candice through her website, www.bewellwithcandice.com and Instagram.

 

 


 

The views and opinions expressed in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the NTA. They are intended for general information purposes, and are not to be considered a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Want your recipe or article to be featured on our blog? Email our team Marketing@nutritionaltherapy.com with your full name, article, a short bio in third person, and a headshot. We may feature you in an upcoming blog post.

 

Resources:

  1. Nutritional Therapy (2019). NTP Module 4: Digestion and Elimination. Nutritional Therapy Association. pg. 1-31.
  2. Frøkjaer, J B, et al. Modulation of Vagal Tone Enhances Gastroduodenal Motility and Reduces Somatic Pain Sensitivity.” Neurogastroenterology and Motility : the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Apr. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26728182. 
 

 

 


 

 

Join us for a Live Webinar with one of our Instructors and Admissions Advisors!

During this call, you’ll explore and learn:

  • How to create a rewarding career in holistic nutrition that will give you the confidence and competence to replace your full-time income (whether you’re new to nutrition or or using it to enhance your current services)
  • How our unmatched education and instructor support sets our NTP program apart from other nutrition programs​​​​​​​
  • How graduates are successfully using their education and the many career opportunities available to you
  • If the NTP program is the right fit for you and how to move forward in financing your education

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The Difference Between Saturated and Unsaturated Fats: Are Fats Good or Bad?

The Difference Between Saturated and Unsaturated Fats: Are Fats Good or Bad?

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Home » Posts Tagged "Healthy fats"

The Difference Between Saturated and Unsaturated Fats: Are Fats Good or Bad?

Difference Between Saturated And Unsaturated Fats

 

We enjoy delicious olive oil and balsamic dressing on our salads, dip cut veggies into lemon tahini, and savor the taste of slow roasted lamb with potatoes and carrots. We love fat! But, how do types of fats differ? What’s the difference between saturated and unsaturated fat? First, let’s talk function.

 

Why are fats important?

 

Fats are crucial for numerous body functions and structures. For example, the fat in our food…

 

  1. Helps us absorb fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K
  2. Improves the taste and enjoyment of food
  3. Increases satiety
  4. Helps regulate the speed we digest food
  5. Provides an important source of high caloric energy that is ideal for long, low-intensity activity
  6. Is needed to build cell membranes and certain hormones
  7. Serves as a protective lining for the organs of the body

 

Saturated vs unsaturated fat?

 

There are three main classes of fats that we will ideally consume. Technically they are called “fatty acids” and are identified by their degree of “saturation.” Saturation refers to whether or not the carbon atoms in each fat molecule are attached to hydrogen atoms or attached to other carbon atoms with double bonds.

 

In order to really understand the difference between saturated and unsaturated fats, we have to take a quick dive into chemistry! This won’t be painful, we promise!

 

Saturated fatty acids

 

Saturated fats are the most stable class since they lack double bonds between carbon atoms and have the maximum number of bonded hydrogen atoms. This class of fats is usually found in animal products and tropical oils, is solid at room temperature, does not go rancid easily, and is the safest choice for cooking. They are saturated with hydrogen! Hence the name, saturated fat.

 

Monounsaturated fatty acids

 

The first form of unsaturated fat we’ll mention are monounsaturated fats. They are less stable than saturated fats since they have one (mono) double bond and less hydrogen atoms. Hence, they are less saturated with hydrogen. This class of fats is found in olives, avocados, and various nuts, and tends to be liquid at room temperature. Monounsaturated fats are safe for low-temperature cooking but should not be used with higher heat. They should also be stored in dark containers to avoid going rancid.

 

Polyunsaturated fatty acids

 

Polyunsaturated fats are the second form of unsaturated fat. They have two double (poly, or more than one) bonds and even less hydrogen and saturation. Because of this, it makes these fats very unstable and highly reactive to light, heat, and oxygen. They should not be used for cooking and always stored away from heat and light to help prevent rancidity. Polyunsaturates can be found in fish, flax, nuts, and seeds, and are best eaten raw. These fats are not suitable for cooking. However, they are incredibly important for optimal physiology and should be eaten daily if possible.

 

What are healthy fats?

 

It’s important to understand that none of these fat classes are “good” or “bad” per se. Each type serves an important purpose for the body and have pros and cons depending on the context. It’s also key to understand that fat containing foods usually include a combination of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fats, so not just one class. Lard, for example, a fat commonly thought of as saturated, actually contains more monounsaturated than saturated fat.

 

Healthy Fat Sources:

 

  1. Grass-fed butter: 7 grams saturated fat/tablespoon (read more about the benefits here)
  2. Avocados: 14 grams of monounsaturated fat/cup (read more about the benefits here)
  3. Coconut Oil: 12 grams of saturated fat/tablespoon
  4. Grass-fed, pastured beef: Contains a balanced amount of saturated and monounsaturated fats
  5. Pastured eggs: A balanced source of all fats including Omega 3 and 6 compared to conventional eggs (learn more here)
  6. Wild-caught Fish: Varies in species, generally contains lower amounts of saturated fats and higher amounts of Omega 3 (learn more here)
  7. Nuts and seeds: 12 grams of saturated fat, 20 grams of polyunsaturated fat, 38 grams of monounsaturated fat/cup of mixed nuts
  8. Olives: 8 grams of monounsaturated fat, 1.42 grams of saturated fat, 0.91 grams of polyunsaturated/10 olives (learn more here)

 

Healthy Fats Infographic

Getting the most out of your fats

 

The ability to break down fats is equally as important as incorporating a variety of fats into the diet. The pH of the stomach also plays a factor in the ability to properly absorb fats. Meals should be consumed in a parasympathetic or calm state to encourage the production of hydrochloric acid (stomach acid). Hydrochloric acid is necessary to assimilate nutrient absorption.

 

Proper gallbladder function is also key in the assimilation of fat. Those who suffer from gallstones or have had their gallbladder removed may benefit from consuming bile salts to help break down fats. 

 

Summary

 

Not all fats are created equal. Our bodies require a diverse variety of fats on a daily basis to be able to see their full benefit. Consuming fats with foods rich in fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K can help to absorb them. Each persons fat needs are unique and bio-individual. Therefore, they should work closely with a physician, NTP, or NTC to determine what fats are best to consume for their body. The important thing to remember is diversity. Aim to eat a variety of types of fat in your diet if at all possible. And, regardless of the class of fat, they are not to be viewed as “good” or “bad”. Consuming all types of fats are necessary for optimal health. 

 


 

 

Join us for a Live Webinar with one of our Instructors and Admissions Advisors!

During this call, you’ll explore and learn:

  • How to create a rewarding career in holistic nutrition that will give you the confidence and competence to replace your full-time income (whether you’re new to nutrition or or using it to enhance your current services)
  • How our unmatched education and instructor support sets our NTP program apart from other nutrition programs​​​​​​​
  • How graduates are successfully using their education and the many career opportunities available to you
  • If the NTP program is the right fit for you and how to move forward in financing your education 

Categories

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